Facebook Flickr Twitter YouTube Itunes   Stumbleupon   Digg

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Bull

In British mythology the bull is often used as symbolic of not only strength but also fertility as it was creature thought to be potent in mating.

‘Tarbh-feis’ was a Gaelic term used, that translates as ‘bull feast’. This feast is thought to be associated with sacred herds of cattle belonging to the king. The bull was used as part of many rituals,  one in particular used to determine the succession of a new king. As part of the ceremony as white bull would be killed and the flesh and blood eaten by a Druid. The hide was then wrapped around the Druid and as he slept his dreams were believed to be full of images of the future king.

It has long been believed that the Isle of Man of the English (UK) coastline has been haunted by a ‘water-bull’ or by the ‘Tarroo-Ushtey’. This creature according to folklore was said to have the power to take mortals to the sea and drown them and therefore was an animal to be treated with respect and caution.