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Days of the Month for February

 

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February 1 : The Day of Wilfulness
Celtic feast of day of ‘Bride’ : To collect dew on this day and then rub it over all the body (See May 1 for further information) was traditionally believed in many parts of rural England (UK) to improve the skin tone.

Celtic feast day of ‘Brigid’, the Abbess of Kildare. The church was said to be on the same site as a sacred oak grove used for pagan worship, and that for one thousand years after her death, a fire was kept alight in the grounds tended by women only although men and women followed a religious life here. Brigid is associated with Mary, a nurturer and provider, and further associated with Celtic worship (See February 2) and midwives. Also associated with Conleth (10 May), Donatus (22 October), Virgil (27 November) and Budoc (8 December). Brigid was seen as the joint protector of cattle together with Columcille (9 June). Druid bard ‘Dubtach’ is believed to be her father.

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February 2 : The Day of Class
‘Candlemas Day’ (See Mystical WWW Christmas special).

German Proverb
‘The badger peeps out of his hole on Candlemas Day, and, if he finds snow, walks abroad,; but if he sees the sun shining he draws back into his hole.’

Scottish Proverb
If Candlemas Day be dry and fair
The half o’ winter’s come and mair;
If Candlemas Day be wet and foul
The half o’ winter was gane at Youl.’
or
If Candlemas Day be fair and bright,
Winter will have another flight,
If Candlemas Day be clouds and rain,
Winter be gone and will not come again.’

English Farmer’s Proverb
‘A farmer should, on Candlemas Day,
Have half his corn and half his hay.’

English Farmer’s Proverb
’On Candlemas Day if the thorns hang adrop,
You can be sure of a good pea crop.’

‘Our Lady’s Feast of Candlemas’, celebrates the coming of light after the darkness of winter. The purification of the Virgin Mary.

Woodbridge, Suffolk, England : Traditional ‘Bread Dole’ festivities.

Christian feast of the ‘Presentation of the Lord’, ‘The Purification’.

‘Groundhog’s Day’ : USA It was believed that if the groundhog sees his own shadow on this day then winter is only half-gone.

Winter ‘Imbolc’, or ‘Oimelc’, sun at 15 degrees in the house of Aquarius (February 2-7). Festivities in ancient times included lighting fires on top of hills across the British Isles to signal to the people that ‘Bel’ would soon return to bring fertility back to the land as winter drew to a close, accompanied by the ‘Earth Goddess’ who would ensure a bountiful harvest. One of four major fire festivals (5-8 May, 2-7 August, 5-7 November, 2-7 February).

Celtic feast day of ‘Brigit’, (also February 1) Irish ‘Mother Goddess’ (also traditionally known as the ‘Queen of Heaven’ in Ireland, ‘Bride’ in Scotland and ‘Brigantia’ in England). It is believed that Brigit has three faces which are associated with the three-leafed shamrock, a leaf that is the emblem of Ireland. Later became ‘St. Bridgid’s Day’, a Christian day dedicated to remembrance of the Irish saint. In ancient times Brigit was associated with poetry, fire, metalwork and the sun, possessing a sacred totem that was believed to have the power of healing in the form of a snake (therefore connected with the role of the priestess in the pagan culture). Further associations are made with St. Patrick (17 March), the patron saint of Ireland (who was known for ridding Ireland of snakes). It is believed by many that the symbolism attached to this action indicates the Christian desire to stamp out pagan practices.

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February 3 : The Day of Exacting Realism
‘St. Blaise's Day’

St. Ethelreda's, Ely place, London, England : ‘Blessing of the Throats’.

Native American : Hopi ‘Powamu festival’.

Winter ‘Imbolc’, sun at 15 degrees in the house of Aquarius (February 2-7). Festivities in ancient times included lighting fires on top of hills across the British Isles to signal to the people that ‘Bel’ would soon return to bring fertility back to the land as winter drew to a close, accompanied by the ‘Earth Goddess’ who would ensure a bountiful harvest. One of four major fire festivals (5-8 May, 2-7 August, 5-7 November, 2-7 February).

Celtic feast day of ‘Ia’ or ‘Ive’, who is said to have sailed to Cornwall, England from Ireland on a huge leaf with missionaries. With the support of a local chieftain she founded a church at St. Ives. Martyred in Brittany.

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February 4 : The Day of the Curve Baller
Winter ‘Imbolc’, sun at 15 degrees in the house of Aquarius (February 2-7). Festivities in ancient times included lighting fires on top of hills across the British Isles to signal to the people that ‘Bel’ would soon return to bring fertility back to the land as winter drew to a close, accompanied by the ‘Earth Goddess’ who would ensure a bountiful harvest. One of four major fire festivals (5-8 May, 2-7 August, 5-7 November, 2-7 February).

 

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February 5 : The Day of Quiet Eloquence
The ancient Greek festival dedicated to the Goddess Aphrodite.

Winter ‘Imbolc’, sun at 15 degrees in the house of Aquarius (February 2-7). Festivities in ancient times included lighting fires on top of hills across the British Isles to signal to the people that ‘Bel’ would soon return to bring fertility back to the land as winter drew to a close, accompanied by the ‘Earth Goddess’ who would ensure a bountiful harvest. One of four major fire festivals (5-8 May, 2-7 August, 5-7 November, 2-7 February).

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February 6 : The Day of Popularity
Winter ‘Imbolc’, sun at 15 degrees in the house of Aquarius (February 2-7). Festivities in ancient times included lighting fires on top of hills across the British Isles to signal to the people that ‘Bel’ would soon return to bring fertility back to the land as winter drew to a close, accompanied by the ‘Earth Goddess’ who would ensure a bountiful harvest. One of four major fire festivals (5-8 May, 2-7 August, 5-7 November, 2-7 February).

Ancient Greek : festival dedicated to ‘Aphrodite’.

Queen Elizabeth II came to the throne on this day in 1952.

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February 7 : The Day of Utopia
Winter ‘Imbolc’, sun at 15 degrees in the house of Aquarius (February 2-7). Festivities in ancient times included lighting fires on top of hills across the British Isles to signal to the people that ‘Bel’ would soon return to bring fertility back to the land as winter drew to a close, accompanied by the ‘Earth Goddess’ who would ensure a bountiful harvest. One of four major fire festivals (5-8 May, 2-7 August, 5-7 November, 2-7 February).

Florence Nightingale declared that she had a vision on this day in 1837. The vision of God told her to take up a mission in life, and within a short amount of time she became a nurse.

Celtic feast day of ‘Tresan’, a devotee and later priest of the church of St Martin by the River Marne in France. Weary from his daily toils of tending swine he fell asleep and was asleep so long he woke to find that his staff had taken root and sprouted leaves.

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February 8 : The Day of Precognition
John Ruskin, art critic, born this day in 1819.

Celtic feast day of ‘Kew’, (sister of Docco), left South Wales for Cornwall, and is said to have controlled a wild boar to prove to her brother, who lived as a hermit, that she could control this creature of the other world. Believed to have had supernatural powers by her brother as a result of this, and to possess the highest qualities.

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February 9 : The Day of Vibrancy
Celtic feast day of ‘Teilo’, sixth century, believed to be buried at Llandaff, Wales. It has been suggested that he was revered after his journey to Jerusalem in the Holy Land, said to have been accompanied by David (1 March) and Padarn (15 April). Revered throughout the Middle Ages. A staff and chalice were recovered from his tomb in 1736. Associated with Ismael (16 June), Dyfrig (14 November) and Oudaceus (2 July).

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February 10 : The Day of Acclaim
Mark Spitz, winner of seven Olympic gold medals, at the 1972 games and breaker of seven world records at the same time, born this day in 1950.

Celtic feast day of ‘Trumwin’, who became Bishop of Abercorn (Scotland) in 681 and led the spiritual practices of the Picts.

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February 11 : The Day of Improved Comfort
‘Shrove Tuesday’ : 1997, movable each year, day before Ash Wednesday.
(See Mystical WWW Easter Special for more information).

Olney, Buckinghamshire, England : Traditional ‘Pancake Day Race’.
(See Mystical WWW Easter Special for more information).

Jersey, UK : Traditional day for Rabbit Shooting.

Ashbourne, Derbyshire, England : Traditional ‘Shrovetide Festival’.
(See Mystical WWW Easter Special for more information).

Winster, Derbyshire, England : Traditional ‘Pancake Day Race’.
(See Mystical WWW Easter Special for more information).

St. Columb Major, Cornwall, England : ‘Hurling the Silver Ball’.

Corfe Castle, Dorset, England : Traditional ‘Street Football’.

Atherstone, Warwickshire, England : Traditional ‘Street Football’.

Scarborough, Yorkshire, England : Traditional ‘Ringing of the Pancake Bell’ and ‘Shrovetide Skipping’.
(See Mystical WWW Easter Special for more information).

Sedgefield and Alnwick, Northumberland, UK : Traditional ‘Shrovetide Football’.
(See Mystical WWW Easter Special for more information).

Bernadette Soubirous, the 14 year old peasant girl who declared that she had a vision of the Virgin Mary near a grotto in Lourdes, France, was born on this day in 1858. She later became St. Bernadette, and Lourdes became a place of Christian pilgrimage.

Celtic feast day of ‘Caedmon’, a lay-brother, believed to have been given the gift of language by God at the Monastery run by Hilda (17 November) in Whitby, England. Said to have had a vision of an angel who told him to sing, despite his belief that he was unable to being shy, and to tell everyone of the story of the Creation. Composed many poems and hymns.

Celtic feast day of ‘Gobnet’, said to have had a vision telling her that the place of her work and home would be where she saw nine white grazing deer. Having already travelled from her home in County Clare to the Aran Islands she travelled on and saw such a sight at Dungarvan. (Now known as Kilgobnet, near the Monavillagh Mountains. Here she ran a nunnery. She is also associated with bee keeping, known to many in folklore as the busy servants of God.

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February 12 : The Day of the Unifier
‘Ash Wednesday’ : Christian Festival, 1997 (movable each year). The beginning of the religious festival of Lent (40 days leading towards Easter Sunday which varies annually. Can also occur during March). (See Mystical WWW Easter Special for more information). First day of the Lenten period.

Abraham Lincoln, President of America, born this day in 1809.

Celtic feast day of ‘Ethilwald’, Bishop of Lindisfarne, a disciple of St. Cuthbert (20 March), died in 740.

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February 13 : The Day of Liveliness
Georges Simenon, writer, born on this day in 1903.

Celtic feast day of ‘Modomnoc’, a monk, of Irish nobility, taught by St. David (1 March), famed for his bee keeping and skills at gardening.

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February 14 : The Day of the Cool Quip
‘Valentine’s Day’ : Christian saint day : (See Mystical WWW Valentine Special).

This day is traditionally associated with Hemp (For more information on plants see Mystical WWW Plants).

St. Valentine Day Massacre, in 1929 by Al Capone’s gang, killed seven unarmed people.

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February 15 : The Day of Inventiveness
Galileo born on this day n 1564.

Celtic feast day of ‘Berach’, related to the Prince of Connaught, taken to study with the church, lived in Glendalough. Famed for his ability on two occasions; the first involved finding red apples for a sick boy which he managed in the middle of winter by blessing a Weeping Willow tree which brought forth buds and fruit; and the second involves Berach being able to control the wild wolf. It is said that a wolf ate one of the calves in his herd. He insisted that the wolf should suckle the cow to comfort it in its grief and ensure that she felt no further discomfort. The wolf obeyed his word.

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February 16 : The Day of Animation
Francis Galton, scientist and proposer of Eugenics, born on this day in 1822.

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February 17 : The Day of the Battler
Goyathlay, ‘One who yawns’, or Geronimo, great Apache leader died on this day in 1908.

Celtic feast day of ‘Loman’, nephew of St. Patrick (17 March). It is believed that Loman accompanied Patrick on his travels in Ireland.

Celtic feast day of ‘Fortchiern’, Irish prince, of Trim, Ireland. Associated with Loman as it is said that Fortchiern was inspired by him, taking the faith. Patrick is said to have built a church at Trim.

Celtic feast day of ‘Fintan’ of Cluain-Edrech, sixth century, he was a disciple of Columba of Tir-da-Glas. Established a monastery at East Meath., and later became Bishop of Lindisfarne. In a vision he was advised to decrease the harshness of life within the monastery, which he did for all except himself. Also reputed to have had dealings with the ‘cult of the severed head’. Associated with Comgall (11 May).

Celtic feast day of ‘Finan’ of Lindisfarne, seventh century Bishop of Lindisfarne, where he built a church made with materials from Holy Island. Known for being generous and being of great humility. Also know for spreading the faith to Mercia and Essex by preparing missionaries to travel the land. (Associated with Colman, 18 February and Aidan, 31 August).

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February 18 : The Day of the Complete Picture
The planet Pluto was discovered on this day in 1930, fourteen years after it had been said to exist by Percival Lowell in 1916.

Celtic feast day of ‘Colman’, Abbot of Lindisfarne, seventh century Irish monk. Who developed a monastic base at Inishbofin, Ireland (taking Aidan’s (31 August) relics with him and thirty brothers). Represented the Celtic church at the Synod of Whitby. Attributed as having described Columcille, also known as Columba (9 June) as ‘Father Columba’ and would spend his life attempting to learn from the ‘lives, customs and discipline’ set by him.

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February 19 : The Day of the Explorer
Celtic feast day of ‘Odran’, associated with Patrick (17 March) as it is said that he steered the cart that took Patrick round on his travels foiling a plot to murder Patrick by sacrificing his own life.

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February 20 : The Day of the Impression
Celtic feast day of ‘Olcan’, Bishop of Antrim, who miraculously was saved from death after he was buried with his mother following the death of his father. The reputation of Olcan is somewhat mixed as it is said that he promised eternal life to a chieftain to keep peace. Fifth century, believed to have instructed Macniss (3 September).

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February 21 : The Day of Intimacy
W.H. Auden, poet, born this day in 1907.

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February 22 : The Day of Universality
‘St. Lucia’s Day’ : Christian saint day. (See Mystical WWW Christmas Special for more information).

Edward Kennedy born this day in 1932.

Celtic feast day of ‘Elwyn’, a monk who later became a saint. A memorial can still be seen to his work at the mouth of the River Hayle. His mission took him on many travels starting in Ireland and ending in Cornwall, England.

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February 23 : The Day of the Viable Candidate
Samuel Pepys, writer, born this day in 1633.

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February 24 : The Day of Sacrifice
Under research. Mystical WWW welcomes submissions for this day. See Mystical WWW email details on ‘What’s new’ Main Index.

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February 25 : The Day of the Higher Cause
‘Day of Nut’ : Ancient Egyptian.

Enrico Caruso, opera singer, born this day in 1873.

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February 26 : The Day of Arousal
Victor Hugo, writer, born this day in 1802.

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February 27 : The Day of the Reality Masters
Under research. Mystical WWW welcomes submissions for this day. See Mystical WWW email details on ‘What’s new’ Main Index.

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February 28 : The Day of Zest
‘Buddha’s conception’ : Tibet.

Christian feast of ‘St. Oswald’ (originally 29 February)

Henry James, novelist, born this day in 1916.

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February 29 : The Day of Eternal Youth
Occurs only once every four years. A day when many roles are traditionally reversed, for example in the British Isles, women can propose marriage against the pre-1960’s norm of the male.
Under research. Mystical WWW welcomes submissions for this day. See Mystical WWW email details on ‘What’s new’ Main Index.