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Ghosts of South West England

AVON (inc. Bristol), BATH, SOUTH WEST ENGLAND

BATH FESTIVAL OFFICE
Linley House Pierreont Place,
Bath
Some members of the staff have been puzzled to hear during the afternoons, the sound of footsteps going upstairs to what they are assured, is an empty room. The unseen visitor never returns but visitors calling to discuss the programme of the Festival have also commented on the noise. In 1962 a former occupant of a flat in the house admitted that she, too, had often heard the arrival of the invisible caller as had a friend of hers. The footsteps always stop outside the door of the flat but on the frequent occasions when the door was opened there was never anyone there.
© Andrew Green

BEEHIVE PUBLIC HOUSE
Landsdowne Road
Bath
Avon
Affectionately termed as 'Bunty'by the licensees is the unknown ghost of a serving-maid who has been seen on at least three occasions since 1974. .Although there has been a slight poltergeist activity, probably caused by a younger member of staff, the phantom itself wears 'a happy expression, a mop cap, a bluish grey gown to the floor, and black, shining shoes'. The favourite place for her appearance is in the hallway where she was seen twice, and an upstairs bedroom. It is unusual to obtain such a clear description of a ghost but a witness claims that she seems to be so friendly. 'She just stands there for a second or two and then fades away.'.
© Andrew Green

BRISTOL CATHEDRAL
Deanery Road
Bristol
Avon
Witnessed by a number of visitors over the past few years has been the figure of a monk in a grey habit which in itself is rather mysterious. As Margaret Royal points out in her 'Bristol Ghosts', when recording the haunting here, Augustinians who founded the priory church, which later became the cathedral, wore black. Were lay-brothers of the order, I wonder, clothed in grey? The library adjoining the cathedral and built on a section of the foundations of the ordinary priory, is haunted by the same monk, always at about 4.30 p.m., presumably at the time for Benediction.
© Andrew Green

GARRICKS HEAD HOTEL
Shaw Close
Bath
Avon
The ghost here is so closely link with the Theatre Royal next door that it is assumed to one and the same, though mysterious knocks and raps and an occasional poltergeist incident associated with the haunting effect only the pub. Establishing that the apparition who visits the theatre is a woman is the 'scent of beautiful jasmine', though experienced mysteriously in the cellars. A number of artists appearing in a production at the theatre have witnessed the misty grey shape in one of the boxes, and others have noticed that it travels out of the window in a room just above the main bar. Frequently the smell of jasmine accompanies these 'visitations'. The phantom is supposed to that of a young woman who jumped to her death in the 1800's when here lover was killed in a duel with her husband. Another belief, however is that she hanged herself in a bedroom. But why should she frequent this pub, especially it seems the cellar, is an utter mystery. Could it be that the site of the dual was in the pub or perhaps she may be buried beneath the barrels?
© Andrew Green

GRAVEL WALK
Victoria Park
Bath
Avon
In 1976 a group of school boys with Paul Buckley, their master, were exploring the planned route of Margaret Royal's popular 'Ghost Walk Tours'. On reaching the steps at one end of the Gravel Walk one boy suddenly became nervous and pointed to a tall man with white hair that apparently only he could see. He refused to discuss the matter on being questioned.

Later that year a party of 14 were being conducted round the tour and a customer asked the guide how the 'gimmick'had been organised. On enquiry the courier learnt that one of the group had seen the figure of the 'white-haired gentleman'standing in the middle of the walk and then suddenly vanish. Another walker was so severely shocked at seeing the unexpected figure of the phantom and its disappearance that he had to under go medical treatment. All these incidents had occurred at approximately 8.45 p.m. A year later the deputy major of Miami also witnessed the apparition and provided more detail. The figure he had seen had his white hair tied behind his head with a ribbon, but, as on previous occasions, the ghost suddenly vanished.
© Andrew Green

LLANDOGER TROW
King Street
Bristol
Avon
The original ghost of this celebrated inn, named after a small village, seems to have partly deserted it, for only his unusual footsteps are heard these days. The Inn, built in 1664, once housed a young physically-handicapped lad who, because of a severe deformity, limped badly. He was born, worked and died here, but relevant dates are, unfortunately, not known. His ghost used to be seen in the yard near a wall in what is assumed to be his bedroom over the Old Bar and on the stairs. A couple who used to live in part of the building saw the ghost of the lad slowly moving up the stairway on two occasions some years ago. Nowadays the sound of a footstep and a 'dragging limb'are heard late at night.
© Andrew Green

SAVILLE ROW
Bennett Street
Bath
Avon
A short distance from the magnificent eighteenth century Royal Crescent one finds the imposing Assembly Rooms and, nearby, Saville Row and Bennett Street, all of which are haunted by one of the best documented ghosts of the county. At least four sketches exist all drawn by witnesses within minutes of their experience and it has been estimated that at least 50 people have seen the phantom, since it was first reported in the 'Bath and Wilts Evening Chronicle'in March 1956.

Typical of the incidents is that recalled by Mrs. Parrish of Wotton-under-Edge, whose report is quoted in the 'Local Ghosts'by Margaret Royal and Ian Girvan. She tells of visiting the city in May 1974 and was trying to park opposite Evans and Owens when a man in a black hat, like that worn by Guy Fawkes, came down Saville Row. He stepped into the road, hesitated, turned back and began to walk towards the front of the Assembly Rooms. 'I took my eyes off him for a second and when I looked back he had vanished...he was dressed very much like Guy Fawkes and as he turned his black cloak swirled out around him. He also seemed to have black breeches and gaiters'. Another reliable witness was former Regimental Sergeant Major Emmett who, when working in the boiler -room, sensed he was being watched. On turning he saw a figure of 'a man in the black hat'standing by the doorway, but as he gazed at the stranger, the apparition disappeared.
© Andrew Green

ST NICHOLAS CHURCH
Brockley
Avon
In an area where legend claims is racked in wraiths including that of a ghostly coach, the phantom of a priest who murdered a local squire, an old woman who causes the death and, of course, a hooded monk, it is encouraging to find a genuine haunting. This is of a woman devoted to the church to such an extent that she spent practically all her life in its maintenance and decoration. She died in 1907. The figure, seen several times in the last few years, is that of a 'little brown lady'who appears hurrying along the aisle before disappearing at the altar, or in the vestry. Here she is seen bending over a desk, apparently cleaning it, but vanishes immediately anyone speaks or moves to within a few feet of her. Recently researchers spending some time in the building, as one would expect, saw nothing but reported that they did hear 'hurried footsteps'.
© Andrew Green

VASSAL PARK
Fishponds
Bristol
Avon
Bob Saywood, a long standing friend of mine, who gained his degree from Bristol University, like many people often returns on nostalgic visits to the city, to re-live the days of his youth. During his studies he heard stories of Vassal Park being haunted by the Duchess of Beaufort but it is only in recent year that he took much notice of the reports.

One afternoon in 1976, accompanied by his wife, Beatrice, he decided to enjoy a quiet stroll through the park and was nearing a small bridge when he noticed an unusual figure at the other end. The image looked rather like a monk in a dark brown gown and a hood but as Beatrice confirmed, 'It seemed to be floating over the path'. It moved forward, away from the Saywoods until it reached a wall a few feet from the bridge and then just 'disappeared'. It was interested to see a similar report by Margaret Royal and Ian Girvan in their excellent booklet 'Bristol Ghost', published in 1977.
© Andrew Green

WAGGON AND HORSE
High Street
Peasdown St John Avon
Although there has been a certain amount of poltergeist activity here, possibly deriving from a member of the staff, the ghost of a tall man wearing a 'weird black hat'has also been witnessed. This figure was seen, rather surprisingly, early one morning standing by the bed of the licensee's sister. The ghost is known to have been haunting the pub before the physical phenomena commenced, which emphasises that they are not necessarily related.
© Andrew Green


CORNWALL, SOUTH WEST ENGLAND

THE BEEHIVE
Coinage Hall Street
Helston
Cornwall
Well known as the market town which presents its famous Furry Dance on Flora Day, Helston also has a legend connected with the Devil. The Prince of Darkness was travelling across the country carrying a huge boulder with which to block the entrance of Hell but was stopped by St Michael and challenged to a duel. In the course of the fight, the stone fell and became, of course, Hell's Stone and it now forms part of a wall in a local hotel. The Furry Dance celebrates the victory over the Devil.

None of this is unfortunately connected with the ghost of the pub though, for the phantom here is that of a 30 year old man dressed in 'modern style'. He has been seen by several people, usually about 10.30 at night and although 'rather shadowy', one customer, believing him to be a casual visitor to the area, greeted him with a 'Good evening'. The figure immediately vanished. He was last seen, or rather reported in April 1976. Some of the witnesses seem to think there is some connection with his appearance and the two murders which occurred on the premises over 150 years ago. They forget that the figure was clothed in a twentieth century suit. It could well be that this apparition is, in fact the ghost of someone still alive., who was closely associated with the pub. There are many such cases of what are called phantoms of the living.
© Andrew Green

DEADMAN`S COVE
Off Hudder Down
Cornwall
Some year ago when holidaying in Cornwall a friend and I were walking south along the coast-line from Portreath when we came to a narrow twisting path leading down to the sea. On reaching the beach, despite the intense heat of the day, we were so cold that we were glad to have brought our jackets. An incredible silence, heightened by an uncomfortable feeling, pervaded the whole area. The rocks were black and the sea hardly moved. We looked at each other and nodded. Within minutes we were back on the roadway heading south to Gwithian. Making enquires we learnt that the cove we visited is known as 'Deadman's' but as to the reason no-one was willing or able to enlighten us. In 1978 John and Alice Parker of Kingston unknowingly followed our footsteps and, unlike us, saw on the beach the tall figure of a man in a black suit standing at the edge of the waves. Walking towards him, they offered a greeting and were astounded when the figure 'slowly faded away'. They told me that they too, were unable to obtain any information about the cove other than, 'Ay, tis 'aunted by a man in black'.
© Andrew Green

JAMAICA INN
Bolventor
Cornwall
'If this inn isn't haunted then it should be', said one visitor to this popular old pub built in 1547. No doubt they had read the well-known work by Daphne du Maurier which featured Jamaica Inn, or perhaps re-called the engrossing film of the same name.

According to Jack Hallam in 'Haunted Inn of England', many visitors have seen the figure of an old seaman sitting on a low boundary wall adjoining the inn and believe it is the ghost of a sailor, killed for his money in the 1800's. His footsteps have been heard near 'Mary's Bar', the site of where he was last seem alive. However, more recently a Mr. K. Pettit of Strood in Kent wrote saying that he and his wife stayed one night at the inn and witnessed the ghost in a bedroom. 'We were shown into the last room on the right of the corridor', he said 'but shortly after falling asleep my wife woke me and said that there was a man standing by the bedroom door. I could see him rather faintly. He seemed to have a three-corned hat and a long, old fashioned coat. He moved gradually and slowly along the end of the beds and the room suddenly went very cold. When he reached the large wardrobe he just walked straight through it and disappeared'. Unaware of the history of the haunting the Pettits told the landlords in the morning of their experiences and received the information that, 'The old man always goes through the wardrobe when he returns to that room'.
© Andrew Green

ROCHE CHAPEL
Near St. Austell
Cornwall
Because of its inaccessibility few locals visit this ruin, except with friends on holiday and then are reluctant to actually enter the tiny building. Occasionally a 'fleeting shadow'is reported in one corner of the room and the 'feeling'of someone moving is experienced. Some say it is the ghost of a leper who used the chapel as his final retreat, others that the phantom is that of a smuggler, or a miner.
© Andrew Green

See Also:

[ Stone Circles in Cornwall ]


DEVON, SOUTH WEST ENGLAND

BERRY POMEROY CASTLE
Berry Pomeroy
Devon
Although visible apparitions have not been experienced here for a few years, the persistent phenomena of the sound of a baby crying continues as a reminder of the ghost who used to haunt a particular arch. The phantom was that of a woman in a long, blue cape complete with a hood and was accepted as that of one of the Pomeroy daughters who murdered her own illegitimate child. According to several tourists and visitors to the ruins 'the feeling of absolute desolation, even stark evil, in those arches is overpowering'. In 1968 the curator was shown photographs taken by two separate groups of visitors which illustrate the phantom of a man in a tricorn hat and in the other the profile of a young woman in dark clothes. Both photographs were taken near the entrance to St. Margaret's Tower.
© Andrew Green

BIDEFORD ROAD
Torrington
Devon
The village of Little Torrington and the nearby town of Great Torrington were both, at one time, affected by visitations of a ghostly black dog. There have been no reports of this being witnessed recently. On 16 February, 1646 a force of 5, 000 men, the majority of whom were cavalry men under Lord Hopton, fought desperately to retain the town against the attacks of Lord Fairfax. In quoting from Battles in Britain by William Seymour, it is hoped to provide information relevant to the experiences of a few residents and a couple visiting the town during the Whitsun of 1976. 'After a brief struggle some of Hopton's cavalry, fighting in narrow streets unsupported by infantry, broke and would have been unable to hold the town even if its entire of stock of powder, stored in the church, had not blown up'.

In 1976, Joan White of Chatham with her husband and two children stayed in the small cottage which had once served the village as a public house. She read with interest in a tourist brochure that 'a disastrous fire all but destroyed the town in the seventeenth century'but no other detail was provided.

On their last day Mrs. White was woken 'just before dawn', by a 'peculiar light in the bedroom. It swung from side to side', she said, 'moving from the back wall to the front. It was soft and golden, swinging in rhythm. When it reached the bedroom floor I heard a woman's voice shouting in a language I could not understand. Then two or three began to protest and then came the noise. It sounded like a group of motor-cyclist roaring past the house, the noise increasing with great speed in a roaring crescendo, then suddenly it stopped, leaving Devonshire peace to reign`. At breakfast her teenage children complained that they too had heard the noise. 'It sounded like a lot of motor-cyclists speeding up the tiny street', or, one might suggest, an explosion of gunpowder. But the streets were empty of humans at the time.
© Andrew Green

CHAMBERCOMBE MANOR
Ilfracoombe
Devon
According to James Turner in 'Ghost of the South West', a secret room was discovered in this fourteenth century building in 1865 which contained a four-poster bed with rotting curtains still drawn round it. When the material was moved aside the skeleton of a young woman was revealed. The remains were buried in the local churchyard after the usual enquires had failed to establish the cause of death or the identity of the girl. More recently, a tunnel was discovered which leads from the nearby manor farm to Hele Beach but whether either of the these incidents are connected with the haunting is unlikely to be established. The ghost remains unknown and, unfortunately, unseen, but her footsteps are still heard walking the corridors of the manor, to the chapel and to the cobbled courtyard. 'Weird moans', are also heard issuing from the former secret room, now only visible through a small window situated between two bedrooms.
© Andrew Green

CHARDSTOCK CHURCH
Chardstock
Devon
Only two miles from the formerly haunted Forde Abbey and within a stone's throw of the Somerset border, travellers find the small village of Chardstock, once governed by the Diocese of Salisbury.

No-one knows who the ghost is that haunts the area round the church or even if she is actually connected with it. However, one or two residents and an occasional friend have noticed a 'middle-aged woman in an old-style long grey dress'moving from the vicarage path towards the church. As she nears the gate she 'just fades away'. She has only been seen as dusk approaches 'usually about 5.30 p.m.'.
© Andrew Green

COWICK BARTON INN
Cowick Lane
Exeter
Devon
Formerly a farm which was renovated in 1963 to become a popular pub the 'Cowick Barton'is haunted, not really surprisingly, by a monk. The area on which the farmhouse existed once contained the monastery of St. Thomas. Mrs. Hayman and Mrs. Jenkins of nearby Wellington Road, told the 'Exeter Express' that the figure of the monk had appeared in their bedrooms. He has also been seen 'in broad daylight'by a small number of residents and a few visitors, walking across the fields to the river.
© Andrew Green

EXETER CATHEDRAL
Bedford Street
Exeter
Devon
The mysterious figure of a nun haunts the cloisters here. Normally seen at about seven o'clock in the evening, she suddenly appears at a spot in the south wall of the nave, walks a few yards to the Church House and vanishes. No-one knows who she is. Although her head is slightly bowed down as if in deep thought, there is no suggestion of great tragedy or horrifying crime being associated with her. One of the most recent sightings was by a couple of members of a group of visiting tourists from France who expressed considerable interest in the nun and asked to which order she belonged.
© Andrew Green

EXETER PRISON
New North Road
Exeter
Devon.
In 1973, two inmates serving long sentences were walking back to their cells when they noticed the figure of a middle-aged man moving along an upper gallery. On reaching a particular cell door he suddenly vanished. The two witnesses were so upset by this incident that they asked to see the Governor of the prison, who understandably dismissed the story as imagination. The two men, however, persisted in their report and the details they related were so identical that the officer was persuaded to examine some old architectural plans of the building, and earlier scheduled of inmates. All three men were surprised to learn that the figure was that of the last murderer to be kept in 'Death Row'the site of the haunting, before being hanged. The Governor immediately arranged for the affected cell and the one immediately below to be cemented over and the end of the gallery to be sealed off. Nevertheless, inexplicable footsteps are still heard in the locality.
© Andrew Green

EXETER UNIVERSITY
Prince of Wales Road
Exeter
Devon
In 1967 several students a few members of the staff were surprised to see the apparition of 'a tall man in a long , white coat' in one of the corridors of this modern university. His identity remains a mystery even though he was also witnesses in 1969, 1970, and 1973 but is thought to be one of the decorators who helped complete the buildings years earlier. There is a possibility, of course, that this might be another phantom of the living, for it is known that one of the team was intensely proud of his work.
© Andrew Green

HOLCOMBE
Near Tiegnmouth
Devon
A stretch of this once major road continues to be haunted by the ghost of a middle-aged man in a long grey overcoat carrying a torch with which he 'flags down'evening motorists. Two local papers have published numerous reports by readers and other statements have been lodged elsewhere, including with the local police. The main area affected seems to be that in the Heatherton Grange Hotel region. A Mrs. Swithenbank of Taunton saw the figure as she drove round the bend of the road near the hotel and was convinced that she had collided with the man. When she went to investigate the road was found to be empty. One of the latest incidents was in 1978 when a motorcyclist had a similar experience but a week earlier a motorist had claimed that he had witnessed the phantom at White Ball, a few miles away.
© Andrew Green

OLD SMUGGLER'S INN
Coombe Cellars
Teignmouth
Devon
To account for the occasional witnessing of the apparition of an 'elderly woman'in one of the bedrooms is the belief that an overnight guest from London was murdered here in the 1700's. From the description given, she is certainly too well-dressed to be the average rural visitor, for she wears a 'pale blue gown and what appears to be jewellery round her neck'. Presumably it was for this that she was killed. The phantom was last seen or at least reported in August, 1972.
© Andrew Green

ROYAL CASTLE HOTEL
The Quay
Dartmouth
Devon
Occasionally the sound of horses'hooves and the crunching of coach wheels have been heard at 'about two in the morning', both by guests and resident staff. Footsteps are also part of the haunting which takes place in the hallway. The original building was extended some many years ago and now incorporates the original coach yard.
© Andrew Green


SOMERSET, SOUTH WEST ENGLAND

CASTLE HOTEL
Castle Green
Somerset
A 52 room hotel which was once part of the castle itself and the haunt of the Duke of Monmouth's army, now contains the phantom of a female violinist, in evening dress. She was seen by a guest some years ago but more recently the sound of her playing is all the visitors may hear.
© Andrew Green

COURT HOTEL
Emborough
Chilcompton
Somerset
This was once the Court House of the infamous 'Hanging'Judge Jeffreys and believed to be haunted by him. It's certainly haunted by someone dressed in clothes resembling those of an old-style judge. The figure has been seen by at least two members of the staff and 'a number'of guests, to walk through what was once the front door, now sealed, and stand beneath a massive oak tree in the garden. Here the ghost fades away after a few moments of apparent contemplation. The sound of the old front door opening and closing has also been heard.
© Andrew Green

FORDE ABBEY
Near Chard
Somerset
During my last visit here in 1971 I was able to obtain confirmation that the figure of a monk in black is still seen, albeit infrequently, in 'The Monk's Walk', part of the cloisters, though at times a similar figure has been witnessed in the Great Hall. He is supposed to be Thomas Chard the abbot responsible for the building of the Great Hall and tower in 1500. It could, however, be any of the group of Cistercian monks who founded the abbey in 1138.
© Andrew Green

GEORGE INN
Church Street
Wedmore
Somerset
The fact that it is over 500 years old and has part of the adjoining churchyard incorporated into its foundations might well be enough to produce a story of the 'George' being haunted, without further evidence. But Don and Betty Henderson who have been licencees since 1972 have had personal experience of the phenomena which is corroborated both by friends and customers. The first witness was Michael Henderson who, when in the bathroom one night, saw an apparition in the mirror. He looked behind him twice and the room was empty but the phantom was still clearly visible in the glass! It was of a woman in 'Edwardian-style clothing, with a high-neck to the blouse', and with long , black hair streaked with grey. The face was quite pleasant and friendly but it slowly faded away and the witness never saw her again. However, what is assumed to be the same ghost was seen by a guest, during a Christmas party. Betty Henderson told the author of 'Local Ghosts'that as she was walking along the corridor she saw a dark figure dressed in a long, black skirt and the same type of blouse 'as was seen by my son'. When the woman reached the bedroom door, she passed straight through it.
© Andrew Green

HOLMAN CLAVEL INN
Culmhead
Blagdon
Near Taunton
Somerset
About 600 years old this former hostelry for monks on their way to Glastonbury is well-known for its skittle alley and 'Charlie'the ghost. Knowing nothing about the haunting, guests have been woken in the early hours by the sound of skittles being played, though, of course, the alley is empty and locked at the time. Mysterious and inexplicable crashes have been heard and objects frequently vanish of their own accord. The ghost, seen only three times since 1970, is that of a monk 'with a long, flowing white robe'standing near a wash basin in one of the bedrooms.
© Andrew Green

KING CHARLES PARLOUR
High Street
Wells
Somerset
Mrs. Mary Ham, former manageress of this mediaeval pub, told the 'Wells Journal' in 1978 that she had seen the ghost of a Cavalier on more than one occasion on the stairway. On mentioning the incident for the first time to the cellarman, who had been working there for a number of years, she was told, 'Oh yes, he's always on the stairs'. Later the new owners, Philip and Ann Hanson, found that the phantom was a bit too disturbing for their young son. He had witnessed the ghostly figure as well, at the top of the Jacobean stairway. Philip reported that on his arrival in July 1977, he thought he had heard the sound of a harpsichord 'coming from somewhere', and then one night he felt something brush past him on the stairway. The sound of heavy footsteps have also been heard at the top of the landing. When a BBC television crew tried to film inside the pub all their lighting equipment suddenly exploded and the flash-gun on a press photographer failed to operate. This type of incident is not uncommon when there is a concentration of electrical energy as can often be found in poltergeist and ghostly hauntings.
© Andrew Green

NUNNEY CASTLE
Nunney
Near Frome
Somerset
The castle itself though built in 1373 and severely damaged during the Civil War, is not as far as I know haunted, and the ghost associated with the area is far from ancient. Several travellers have seen a man of about 35 wearing a sports jacket and flannel trousers standing beside the lane leading to the castle, hitching a lift. A number of motorists who have stopped to pick him up find that he has vanished. After waiting a few seconds for him to approach them, they have got out of their car to look for the stranger but he has completely disappeared. One or two friendly drivers have been so disturbed by the vanishing hiker that reports are filed by the local police. On more than one occasion the motorist claims to have actually had the man in the car with them, but he has vanished before reaching his destination of Critchill.
© Andrew Green

PORLOCK HILL
Porlock
Somerset
Despite several attempts to improve the safety aspect of this notorious hill with its one-in-seven gradients, it remains the scene of many accidents, especially during the winter months. There are various stories of phantom coaches even a hearse and 'an old man desperately trying to stop his bicycle' being seen and vanishing as they reach portions of the adjacent hedgerow. One of the most recent multi-hauntings is that of a coach and four which was careering silently down towards a Dormobile. The driver of the van, failing to realise that the ancient vehicle was intangible, took rapid evasive action by driving into the near-side field. Three of his four passengers had seen the coach, and were astonished to see it vanish on the other side of the road in front of another car which 'practically drove through it'.
© Andrew Green

See Also:

[ Stone Circles in Somerset ]


WILTSHIRE, SOUTH WEST ENGLAND

AVEBURY MANOR
NR Marlborough
Wiltshire
When some years ago I had the pleasure of visiting Avebury I was disappointed to find that the manor was closed and the owner at that time, Professor Sir Francis Knowles, was away, I had called on the wrong day but a member of the staff was kind enough to assure me that this glorious Elizabethan house was haunted. One day an au pair girl asked one of the staff if the visitor was staying for lunch and on enquiry replied that there was a 'gentleman monk'sitting in the library. She hardly believed it when assured that there was no-one there but on returning to the room had to admit that the uninvited guest had vanished. Another girl staying in the manor a few years later enquired of the man in the garden that she had seen from her bedroom window. Puzzled at the response, she described his clothing which matched that of a Cavalier, and nor were there any fancy dress parties, or filming to provide reason for the appearance of this gentleman. Miss Kathleen Wiltshire in her book 'Ghosts and Legends of the Wiltshire Countryside' mentions both these incidents and also admits that she experienced a 'queer feeling' in the room from which the Royalist had been witnessed. Whilst dealing with Avebury it should be mentioned that an executive of the then Ministry of Works, when returning home from visiting the house by way of a path adjoining Truslow Manor, saw at an iron gate, the figure of a lady in white lace with a white hood , 'like a nun'who suddenly appeared. This identical appearance was also experienced by Mrs. Matthews of Avebury in 1971 and an overseas tourist in 1976.
© Andrew Green

LITTLECOTE HOUSE
Near Hungerford
Wiltshire
The haunting of this historic Tudor Manor house has been known for many years, having been featured in Scott's 'Rokeby'and 'Coaching Days and Coaching Ways' by W. Outram Tristram, yet it still exists. The ghosts originate from the sixteenth century murder of a new-born baby by the father, William Darrell. In 1970 a journalist visiting the affected bedroom was surprised to see the figure of 'What was obviously a nanny or midwife, carrying a small child', standing beside the four-poster bed 'I was just about to get my camera when the image vanished. At the time I had never heard about Darrell or his activities'. More recently a member of the Wills Family, who owns the house was acting as a guide, when a woman in a blue gown was seen walking up the stairway on the third floor. Access to this area was closed to visitors by a cord tied across the banisters but the figure of the woman passed straight through.
© Andrew Green

LONGLEAT HOUSE
Warminster
Wiltshire
Not often reported but, it is believed, fairly frequently witnessed, from the comments obtained by visitors, is the ghost of a lady in a green dress who frequents a particular corridor. They claim is that she is Louisa Careret, unfaithful wife of the Viscount Weymouth. Her husband discovered her with her lover and fought a duel with him, burying his body in the cellar. The actual site of the haunting is still called the 'Green Lady's Walk'.
© Andrew Green

MADDINGTON
Shrewton
Wilton
Many parts of this village are hunted by the same ghost, that of a young woman. Not far from the site marked as 'The Gibbet' Mr. Alexander was working in a bar with his daughter and suddenly, on glancing up saw the apparition wearing a long white costume, standing only a few feet away. His daughter asked who she was and the ghost vanished. The Reverend Barnard, a former vicar, admitted that he too had seen the girl who had visited the church on more than one occasion. Two other witnesses saw her glide past their cottages window on a couple of occasions and believe she is the ghost of a novice from a former seminary in Maddington Manor.
© Andrew Green

WARDOUR CASTLE
Tisbury
Wiltshire
Restored in 1960 for the Cranbourne School, thus magnificent house, built in 1768 is believed to be where Lady Arundel underwent a siege by Cromwell's forces. Actually, the ruins of the real castle are in the grounds. Naturally, the figure of a woman who has been seen walking across the lawns shortly before dusk is assumed to be that of Blanche, but that could well be wishful thinking. Admittedly, the figure is clothed in a gown of the period and she only frequents the landscaped relics, but she might well be one of her companions who helped to withstand the rebel army.
© Andrew Green

[ Stone Circles in Wiltshire ]