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FRIDAY

The Day of the Love
The Day of Venus

frigedaeg or frige dag (Anglo-Saxon) freitag (Germanic) dies veneris (Latin) sukra-var (Hindu) juma (Islamic) vendredi (French) kin youbi (Japanese)

This is traditionally the sixth day of the week. The name given to this day in ancient Rome was 'dies Veneris' as is was a day dedicated to Venus. Later the French named the day 'Vendredi' believed to have derived from the same origin. In northern countries the closest equivalent to the Goddess Venus was 'Frigg' or 'Freya' with the day becoming known by the Anglo-Saxons as 'Frige dag', later to Friday.
Traditionally associated in many parts of Europe with misfortune as this was believed to be the day when Christ was crucified at Calvary, and also that this was the day that Adam was tempted by Eve with the Forbidden Fruit. Within the Roman Catholic faith Friday was traditionally a day of abstinence. Today it is a still viewed as a day for some private act of self-denial (For further information see Mystical WWW Easter).
According to tradition there are some practices that should be avoided if possible on a Friday including, births, weddings, the sailing of a ship, cutting your nails or starting a new job. This is indicated in the following rhyme:

'Whoever be born on Friday or it's night,
He shall be accursed of men,
Silly and crafty and loathsome to all men,
And shall ever be thinking evil in his heart,
And shall be a thief and a great coward,
And shall not live longer than to middle age.'

A contradiction is expressed if a child was born on this day in 'Days of the Week', which indicated a more favourable omen. And indeed it is said that in 1492 Columbus set sail and sighted land on a Friday.
In Hungarian (Europe) folklore it was believed be an omen of bad luck to be born on a Friday although it was believed that the onset of misfortune could be avoided or removed by placing some of your own blood on some of your own old clothing and then burning it.
The criminal underworld have an old belief that 'a burglary committed on a Friday will probably result in arrest' as perhaps a sign of divine intervention and retribution upon the criminal, and if you were bought to trial for any offence on a Friday it was thought to be a bad omen. In the British Isles and USA Friday was the customary day to carry-out hangings and so was sometimes referred to as 'Hangman's Day' or 'Hanging Day'. (This perhaps is connected to the Christian belief in a Friday being the worst day of the week, as this was the day identified with the Crucifixion and the death of Christ).
If it rains on a Friday an old rural belief (UK) was that it indicated the forecast would be fine on the following Sunday.
If you dreamt on a Friday night of an event or people and then told the content of the dream to someone in your family on the Saturday morning it was more likely to happen.
In Scotland (UK) and Germany (Europe) according to an old belief Friday was thought to be a good day to go courting (dating). Norse men traditionally saw this as a positive day, the luckiest of the week.
'Black Friday' has been regularly used to label days of significance within the British culture. This was the name given to December 6 1745 in the British Isles. This was the day that information reached London (UK) that the Young Pretender had reached Derby (UK). The threatened General Strike was cancelled on 15 April 1921 affecting the stance of the British Labour Movement (UK). The Government (USA) flooded the open market with gold to bring down prices on 24 September 1869 ruining the livelihoods of many speculators in USA.
Mohammedans believe that Adam was created on a Friday, and so the day is seen to be the Sabbath. It is also believed that Eve tempted Adam with the Forbidden Fruit on this day, and that later both died on a Friday.
Friday is believed to be a day of misfortune too for Buddhists and Brahmins.
'Long Friday' was another name given to Good Friday (For further information see Mystical WWW Easter) by the Saxons. It is thought that the name derived from the fact that this was a day of abstinence.
According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the 'Manual' in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day. (For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).